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Science News

Parkinson’s Foundation researchers and other scientists worldwide make continual advances in understanding Parkinson’s disease (PD) with revolutionary research. We monitor it all in our effort to improving care and advance research toward a cure. Browse our collection here:

“The Parkinson’s Pandemic: A Call to Action”
Wednesday, November 15, 2017

JAMA Neurology, “Viewpoint”, 11/13/17

Authors: E. Ray Dorsey, MD, Department of Neurology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY; and Bastiaan R. Bloem, MD, PhD, Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Novel Brain Scan May Reveal Mechanism of Cognitive Change in Parkinson’s
Thursday, August 17, 2017

A novel type of PET scan of the brain can detect changes associated with cognitive difficulties in Parkinson’s disease (PD), according to research published in the July 12 online edition of Neurology.  The finding suggests a new potential target for drugs to treat mild cognitive impairment in PD.

Brain MRI Tracks Parkinson’s Progression
Friday, August 18, 2017

Researchers at a Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence have found that a brain MRI that uses a special protocol can track changes that occur as Parkinson’s disease (PD) progresses. This biomarker could be used in clinical trials, as an objective way to monitor whether the therapies being tested are effective. The study appears in the August 2017 issue of Brain.

FDA Approves Extended-Release Amantadine (Gocovri) for Treatment of Dyskinesia
Friday, August 25, 2017

The Parkinson’s Foundation alerts the community that extended-release amantadine capsules (GOCOVRI™) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of dyskinesia in people with Parkinson's disease receiving levodopa-based therapy. This new approval was announced by the manufacturer on August 24.

Brain MRI Tracks Parkinson’s Progression
Friday, August 18, 2017

Researchers at a Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence have found that a brain MRI that uses a special protocol can track changes that occur as Parkinson’s disease (PD) progresses. This biomarker could be used in clinical trials, as an objective way to monitor whether the therapies being tested are effective. The study appears in the August 2017 issue of Brain.

A Report on Pregnancy and Parkinson’s Disease
Friday, July 28, 2017

About half of women with Parkinson’s disease (PD) who become pregnant experience worsening of their PD movement symptoms during pregnancy, according to a new review of the sparse medical literature on PD and pregnancy.  For some, taking levodopa medications can help; and based on limited data, these drugs seem to be safe for both mother and child.

Activating Specific Brain Cells Points to New Strategies for Parkinson’s Therapy
Tuesday, July 25, 2017

In experiments with mice, scientists were able to activate certain brain cells to ease movement symptoms similar to those of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The results may help explain the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery on Parkinson’s symptoms, and may pave the way to developing longer-lasting therapies. The study appears in the May 8 online edition of Nature Neuroscience.

Non-Surgical Deep Brain Stimulation Shows Promise in Animal Studies
Tuesday, July 11, 2017

In the June 1 edition of Cell, researchers describe a way to electrically stimulate areas deep within the brains of mice using electrodes placed on the scalp. If further research bears out these early results, the technique might eventually provide an alternative to deep brain stimulation, which uses surgically-implanted electrodes, as therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Extended-Release Amantadine May Help Dyskinesias
Monday, July 10, 2017

An extended-release formulation of amantadine is safe and effective for relieving troublesome dyskinesias in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), according to a new study.  The results appear in the June 12 online edition of JAMA Neurology.  A decision on the drug’s approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected this year, meaning it could be available to people with PD relatively soon.

New Evidence that the Immune System Can Be Activated in Parkinson’s
Wednesday, June 21, 2017

A new study funded in part by the Parkinson’s Foundation shows how the loss of brain neurons in Parkinson’s disease (PD) could, in part, result from an attack by a person’s own immune system.  Furthermore, the researchers link this attack to alpha-synuclein – the protein that forms toxic clumps in the brain cells of people with PD.  The results appear in the June 21 online edition of Nature.

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